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Search Results 150 to 199 of about 278 (some duplicates have been removed)
america. >> i studied civil rights and slavery. i was so affected by an american story that was so different from the way that i had seen our country. i remember justngu know. >> reporter: it's that fury and indignation that have fueled rickard's work but because he's not on the scene taking the photographs, it's also controversial. on-line viewer comments can range from compelling and fascinating work to... >> this guy says lazy, pathetic and entirely uninteresting. so it's all over the board. people have commented that i'm not even a photographer. >> of course it's photography. yeah, i think that what doug is doing is looking through the... through google as part of his lens. the internet is helping redefine what it means to be a photographer. >> you see this? then you come right into here. there's damage. >> reporter: in fact, rickard says in an ocean of digital imagery creating something special is becoming more and more difficult. no matter how easy the tools are. >> i think it really boils down to what you bring to it. you know, that's between your ears ultimately. art is abo
. thousands of attorneys representing two major presidential candidates civil rights groups are in place policied to challenge electoral results that may be called in question by machine failures, voter suppression or other allegation of illegal activity. that is a story also in "u.s.a. today" taking a look at what happened in 2000 in florida and saying that possibly another state could be like florida in battleaybe ohio or other ground states where you could have a recount and not know who the winner of the election is. also front page of the "wall street journal" medicare complicates the senior vote. senior citizens are a coveted bloc in florida where three make bum a quarter of the electr elee and they are important to romney given the deficit among young voters and minorities. he needs not only to win among seniors but win big. in 2008 john phmccain captured e group by 8% margin but lost to president barack obama. mr. romney is leading among the elderly by 6% to 12% a sign he may be weathering a charge by democrats that he and ryan with undermine medicare. that is the "wall street jo
, notably some of the nominations to the supreme court, and the soft attitude on civil rights to woo southern support." "the des moines register" endorsed nixon after, after the watergate burglary which occurred on june 17th of that election year. in june of the election year, the democratic party headquarters in washington was broken into in the middle of the night and instantly the entire world suspected richard nixon. in september of the election year, seven co-conspirators were indicted in the burglary including two men with strong ties to republican world. watergate got one line. one line in "the des moines register's" presidential endorsement in 1972. "we are disturbed by the watergate scandal and the evidence linking it with the white house." they were disturbed but not disturbed enough not to endorse richard milhous nixon. there wasn't a kid in my high school who didn't know that tricky dick was a crook, but "the des moines register" editorial board didn't know that. >> i'm not a crook. >> 19 days before "the des moines register" endorsed that crook, bob woodward and carl ber
to hell was a joke. joining me with reaction from the new york civil rights coalition, motorcyclal miers and david webb. i'm torn. i hear the comments and i'm like, wow. when i went to atlanta and i was a local host. i knew hosea williams and maynard jackson, welcomed me my first day. andrew young, joseph lowrie -- these are guys that put their lives on the line. nothing but respect. i am shocked, honestly. i said on my radio -- you were excoriating me because i said i would give him some benefit of the doubt. you think i'm nuts. >> you are a hypocrite. that's ridiculous. but what is the world coming to? have you governor christie, in new jersey, you have the disciple of martin luther king jr.-- >>> i never heard this. i have been around this man -- [overlapping dialogue] >> listen to me, you talk about andrew young. the other disciple of martin luther king went to the same church with reverend lowrie, preaching the gospel of racial idios idiocy. >> it came down to a threat. they didn't see it as a threat because there wasn't a black man in the white house. when i talk byou can't paint o
is overseeing school districts to make sure they are following the law. the office of civil rights is in charge of that. a spokesman told us they respond to complaint, but no one is enforcing title 9 on a regular basis so they do not know who is complying and who's not. raj? >> thank you, jena. if you have a tip for one of the investigative reporters or the unit itself including issues while you try to vote next tuesday give us a call at 888-996-tippers on send us an e-mail directly to the unit at nbc bay area.com. >>> okay. you certainly needed the umbrella and raincoat because the bay area woke up to rain today, but a big change is in store, jeff ranieri is live for us. keep the umbrella, put away the umbrella? >> we've had eight weeks with these extreme changes with temperatures in the 60s and then we go back to the 80s and the 90s and we have more coming up in the next seven-day period. the halloween storm did provide very impressive totals and it finally started to get out of here by 10:00 and 11:00 this morning this morning with a few of those struggling showers down into morgan hill and
from just the civil rights era. if you define it as being able to vote without barriers, it's still indanger. >> i wish we had more time. stay with us. much more ahead. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. much more ahead. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me br
of another era or the civil rights movement of our time gathers force until the e powers-that-be can no longer sustain the inequality, the injustice and yes the immorality of winner take all politics. first, david stockman a one-time enforcer of the reagan revolution. >> there was clearly reckless speculative behavior going on for years on the wall street. >> and john reed, a banker's banker who was in when washington loaded the dice and wall street rolled them. >> is t wasn't that there was one or two instutions that you know got carried away or did stupid things, it was we all did. and then the whole system came down. >> and at our new website obillmoyers.com, i interviuted two occupy wall street organizers who giveed us u insi into the movement and what it hopes to accomplish. we'll also link you to our interview with the editorsi of o "mother jones" magazine and their coverage of the "dark money" that has cast a deep shadow across this election year. that's at billmoyers.com. see you there and see you here next time. >>> got a question for bill, bring it to you at billmoyers.com.
-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of
but it is not even. here's the figure i want you to consider. from the u.s. civil rights commission which analyzed the in the dumpster, the ballots that were cast, if you are african-american, the chance of your ballot will get spoiled is 900% higher than if you are a white voter. that ain't no accident. it's an apartheid vote counting system we have in america. we are back to jim crow. not jim crow, it stopped or james crow systems analyst. that is how it is working. that is the new gimmick we are trying, that is happening and that is where the monies being spent and that's what makes the data trust dangerous. if they want to use it to pick out people who bowl and say bowlers made paul ryan fine but what if you are doing is mailing letters to soldiers on active duty with the game of challenging them, that is a crime according to bobby kennedy. and i have to say, while al gore grabbed his ankles in 2000 after he read, personally read my story that was breaking in england. this was before the supreme court ruled that thousands of like people were banished from the voter rolls in florida and after j
-war movement and what was happening with respect to the civil rights movement, and so i would hope that we're going to see more of that. >> how come? >> because young people, they communicate in a lot of different ways and everything moves so fast today that you can set the world on fire in a positive way just through a message that goes through the internet in a way that -- i had to go buy an album or a cartridge, you know. that's old school. >> if you're re-elected, you go into a second term, sasha and malia will be in the midst of their teens. what are you most worried about, malia getting a driver's license, malia going out on a date, or malia being on facebook? >> i'd worry about facebook right now, only because, look, i know the folks at facebook, obviously they've revolutionized the social networks, but malia because she's well known, you know, i'm very keen on her protecting her privacy. she can make her own decisions obviously later as she gets older. but right now, even just for security reasons, she doesn't have a facebook page. dates, that's fine because she gets secret service
protections for our churches and guarantees the civil right to commit to the one you love. while there are those trying to divide us, presidents obama and clinton stand with us. pastors, business leaders, newspapers, democrats and republicans are all coming together for question 6. because it's about fairness-- treating everyone equal under the law. and who could be against that? new this morning... there's nnw information today... about the september terrorist attack on the u-s consulate in libya... that left 4 americans &pdead. according to a senior u-s intelliggnce official... - between the initial call for officers arrival attthe u-s mission. the officers allegedly used thhse 25 minutee to get weapons loaded inno vehicles... while others were on the phone trying to get loccl "friendly" militias wiih heavier weapons to help. the new information comes in rrsponse to report last on the ground were ordered to s u-s officials say that's simply not true. 3republican presidential candidate mitt romnny plans to make his closing argumentt today... to the american event in wisconsin
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
says education is the civil rights issue of our generation. as we narrow the the achievement gap went to raise the expectations of students. my wife and nine went all the way through the schools here. i'm more excited today. we came in first place to a half years ago in race to the top. it is one thing to win a competition and we're implementing it. we announced two months ago that for the school year 10,000 more kids were proficient in math than the year before. >> i wanted to speak to the racial difference. >> the other investment we're making which will help african- american kids and -- is the significant commitment to the early childhood education. we will be increasing over the next five years the percentage of high needs kids who are involved in [indiscernible] there is evidence that shows the most effective economic development investment the state could make is in early childhood education. what we're saying is two things. the early childhood centers that were really good, it is not a financially responsible decision to -- we would have freincreasee reimbursement. they have t
. rosa parks took the upper seat in montgomery, alabama. it did not create the civil- rights movement. it was a courageous act, but public opinion had changed before that. and the reason we know that public opinion change first is because rosa parks did the same thing 12 years earlier and nothing happened. in between, african-american soldiers came back from world war ii, southerners came back north with a different set of views, but jackie robinson began to play major-league baseball. the political process caught up later and it took a catalyst to spark the change. right now we are in one of those moments where public opinion is ahead of the political leadership. >> importantly, what rick says about people walking into thoughts and ideologies is true, but on the other hand every poll shows that people want our elected officials to compromise and get things done. that is the message. >> i am accompanying ed miller, from texas. karl rove is single-handedly responsible for turning my mother into an armchair pollster. every other day she calls up and says -- french, obama is up by three.
was a party for civil rights. >> exactly. >> caller: exactly. exactly, so they are trying to even pull something from 40, 50 years ago, to make up for what they don't have now. >> yeah. >> stephanie: david crosby of crosby stills and gnash -- >> what? >> stephanie: right? coming up on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ fruit just got cooler. fruit on one side, cool on the other. new ice breakers duo. a fruity, cool way to break the ice. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ [ inaudible ] ♪ ♪ it's just a good vibration ♪ ♪ it's such a dreamy sensation ♪ >> stephanie: jacki, what are you doing? >> i'm working. >> what are you doing? >> i'm working. i'm coordinating with my fabulous producer lisa on what we're going to do in the news coming up in the next segment. >> stephanie: we're a bad influence. >> we are. >> stephanie: fifty minutes after the hour. that's what we do, we get people in trouble. >> do you know how many bouquets of flowers i have to buy her now. are you aware of all of the maybing up i'm going to h
. it began with the passage of the civil rights act in the '60s when the old dixiecrats like jesse helms left the democratic party because it became too racially inclusive and began gradually to take over the republican party. it's so dangerous to have one of our two big parties controlled by extremists because it makes people think that issues are equally divided when they are, in fact, not. they're 70-30 or 60-40. i think our long-term job is to take back the republican party. >> and just very quickly what is your prediction for tuesday? >> you know, it all depends who votes. if it is a lowered voter turnout, which obviously the governor and legislature of florida wants because they have cut the voting time almost in half and increased the ballot to 12 pages or something, then it will be an older, richer, whiter electorate. if it is a higher turnout, then it will be a more inclusive electorate. so a low turnout will elect romney-ryan. a high turnout, a true democratic turnout, will absolutely re-elect obama. >> yeah, and some states, from what i understand, the voting forums are like 30 pag
with opposing the war in chicago, very much part of our civil rights movement. chicago was the most segregated city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
for one minute rebuttal. markell: psychiatry arne duncan says and i agree that education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware and closing the chief of the gatt which we keep a close eye on. the achievement gap we want to raise the achieve of all students, and that is exactly what we are doing. i am more excited about what is going on in public schools in delaware today than i've ever been. my wife and i. she went all the way through the schools right here in newark, but i'm more excited today. we came in first place in two and half years ago on race to the top. it's one thing to win a competition and now we are implementing it and making progress. we just announced two months ago that it ended in june 2000 market for proficient in reading and 9,000 more proficient enough in the year before. i want you to speak to the racial difference. we know that achievement gap. i thought you were asking about all the folks >> moderator: the only significant investment we are making we have a lot of african-american kids as our significant commitment to early chi
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. so i had to look the part. to work in fashion. t.j.maxx is such a great place cause i know when i go in there, i'm gonna score. they've got such great deals on all my favorite brands. fashion direct from designers. savings direct to you. t.j.maxx. >>> it is 7:54. let's say hello to our facebook fan of the day. we say hello to brittany wharton. brittany tells us it is her 25th birthday. and all that she asked for was her power to stay on. >> yes. >> we hope it did. >> yes. >> we have an update on it, we hope it did, and for your chance to be tomorrow's fan, log on to the facebook page and leave a comment under brittany's picture. >> i'm assuming that it did. >> i hope it did. >> brittany, if you're watching, if you have power, let us know and let us know which one of those, who of those two women are you in the picture. >> we asked to see how you are experiencing the super storm. >> many of you answer
the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> straight ahead at 8:00, surviving sandy, the east coast shuts down as the deadly superstorm moves closer from school closings to storm surges, we have you covered with live team coverage all morning long. good morning everybody, i'm tony perkins. >> i'm allison seymour. right now, the storm is making its way up the east coast, poised for a district hit on the mid-atlantic tonight. >> in preparation of that, states of emergency have been declared from virginia to massachusetts, and president obama has promised a quick federal response. experts say sandy could impact some 50 million people up and down the east coast. it is already blamed for the deaths of 65 after sweeping through the caribbeans. >> now here at home, officials aren't taking any chances. >> that's because most schools in the region are closed, so is the federal government and the dc city government. you can see the full list of delays scrolling at the top of your screen and online at myfoxdc.
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
, fred. >> all right, gentlemen, this young man, a junior in pennsylvania has filed this civil rights suit because he says he was the one who was violated. a sexual encounter he had with somebody on a ten-day field trip was videotaped. the school ended up suspending him for "inappropriate behavior." so regard, how will he go about saying he was the one who should not be disciplined, but the ones who carried out the videotape. >> this someone was his girlfriend of two years, the last week or day of their trip, they had resolutions, which were surreptitiously recorded by somebody, shades of tyler clemente in rutgers, the student says please help me, do something here. and they do. they suspend him and his girlfriend and the video maker, who has charges pending in juvenile court. in any event, the school district did not step back for a minute, they didn't appreciate or act on what happened here. they acted insanely, and some moron suspended him and his girlfriend. they will pay the price for this one, fred, trust me, this case will end quickly in a confidential settlement. the school wa
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
of the series with the civil rights history in america. that was kind of a fundamental place from each of them also worked on a documentary series deal the following country but i learned by working in production and then bike immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to that best practices thing that happens in institutions. where you're not just struggling to make the thing, you're actually talking about and you also have community and resources. i think if you can afford it, i think that it's certainly a powerful river i just happened to have learned the hard as we possible can which is used by working in production, not doing anything else. >> is the issue here the kind of method, the institutions and the sort of patterns of careers that allows people to train to the sort of watchdog type stuff, whether they were exactly journalists or did someone thinks? are those drawing up? i mean -- >> i mean, documentary film is interesting because in some ways i think that's a really exist at a british ship model is part of how you become a film maker. but i think in jour
. >> and very proud of that. they were very involved in the civil rights movement and they made me politically aware back then in the 1960s, and we're bringing back the four original members of the rascals. >> oh, great. >> good to talk to you, again. we failed to mention, we had talked before earlier in the show, so really appreciate it. we hope you get your power back and then everything works out for you and your family and your friends, and obviously we'll be supporting the money that you're going to be raising for awareness and to help those folks that are out there in the region. >> thank you. thank you, cnn, for supporting this very, very worthwhile cause. >> thank you, steven. appreciate it. >> here's what we're working on for this hour. >> just five days until the election. will it come down to ohio? plus this. >> manhattan, partially paralyzed after superstorm sandy flooded parts of the city. the fight for taxis, buses, and subway rides as people start returning to work. in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder wha
form of tax increase. we should lead by setting a high example for civil liberties and civil rights and due process and rule of law which is why we should close guantanamo and restore habeas corpus. i know he'll be able to help me turn the page on the ugly partisanship in washington so we can bring democrats and republicans together to pass an agenda that works for the american people. jon: well, that was then-senator barack obama promising big change during his 2008 successful presidential campaign. those promises you just heard pretty much went unfulfilled over the past four years including his vow to work with the other side of the aisle. our next guest says if president obama had lived up to his promises, things would look very different right now. fred barnes writing in "the weekly standard," quote: if he had done in his first term what he now vows to accomplish in his second term, he'd be this a far stronger position to win re-election next tuesday. he might have been a shoo-in. fred, you know, people have short memories when it comes to re-election time. take us back to four
just today its civil rights division will send 780 federal observers to monitor polling places. it's sending personnel to 51 jurisdictions in 23 states including six battleground states. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns on the case for us from washington now. joe, i would ask you why they're doing this, is this something new? i know why they're doing it, but is it new? >> it's not new quite frankly, don. they've done this before. but when you think about it go over the numbers one more time. government is going to essentially 780 observers or justice department personnel, 51 jurisdictions, 23 states, six battleground states, what we found so interesting is the number of people they're sending to individual states. florida's number one on the list. government sending observers to a total of seven different counties in the sunshine state. state of pennsylvania is the runner-up with five different counties followed by ohio and texas each with four locations. and maricopa county, arizona, home of sheriff joe arpaio, also is going to have federal observers. >> yeah. and w
Search Results 150 to 199 of about 278 (some duplicates have been removed)

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